A doc­u­ment that was leaked dur­ing the ongo­ing Epic vs. Apple law­suit seems to reveal the num­ber of down­loads that each free game offered on the Epic Game Store gath­ered. It also showed the lump sum paid to each devel­op­er. The doc­u­ment was post­ed on Twit­ter by Simon Carless–GameDiscoverCo founder and for­mer Gama­su­tra editor–with the num­bers run­ning form Jan­u­ary to Sep­tem­ber 2019.

Leaked doc­u­ments should always be tak­en with a grain of salt, but with all the prepa­ra­tion need­ed for large law­suits, it’s pos­si­ble these num­bers are real. Car­less stat­ed he obtained the doc­u­ment from the pub­lic Apple vs. Epic doc­u­ment repos­i­to­ry on the cloud con­tent site, Box. 

The num­bers give a glimpse into the cost of “free” games. For exam­ple, Epic $1.4 mil­lion to Unknown Worlds for Sub­nau­ti­ca as a tem­porar­i­ly free game on Epic Games Store. Most of the amounts paid are in the hun­dreds of thou­sands of dol­lars, with the excep­tion of Metro: 2033 Redux which was appar­ent­ly bought for $0.

The doc­u­ment also showed the num­ber of Epic accounts and the per­cent­age of accounts that were new to Epic, as well as a col­umn that cal­cu­lates how much the com­pa­ny spent on each new user. This met­ric is abbre­vi­at­ed UA, or “User Acquisition.” 

The whole rea­son­ing behind these free games was to bring new users to Epic Games Store so they can estab­lish a base against Steam. Epic is able to attempt this takeover because of the mas­sive amount of mon­ey Fort­nite has made them in the last few years.